‘Adaptation in the Humanities’ conference – postponed until September 2021

The conference has been postponed until September 2021. Our primary concern is the health and safety of all involved in the conference, and we are aware of the need to ensure the conference is as safe an environment as possible for all.

The conference will now take place at The University of Western Australia, Thursday 30 September – Saturday 2 October 2021.

Digital registration to the conference will be possible to make attendance as open as possible to interstate and international attendees.

Call for Papers close on Monday 12 April 2021.

The Call for Papers for article submissions in the Limina Journal ‘Adaptations’ Special Edition remains open. Limina welcomes article submissions on the conference theme for the special issue to be launched at the 2021 Conference.

We look forward to seeing you in Perth in 2021!

Updates about the conference will be posted on this website as details are confirmed.

‘Adaptation in the Humanities’ conference – COVID-19 Response

We are closely monitoring the situation in relation to coronavirus (COVID-19) and its potential impact upon the ‘Adaptation in the Humanities’ conference this October.

Based on current Australian Government advice, we are continuing work as planned to hold the conference on 3–4 October 2020.

We are mindful of uncertainty prompted by the outbreak and cannot predict what impact it will have in the coming weeks and months.

Our primary concern is the health and safety of all involved in the conference, and we are aware of the need to ensure the conference is as safe an environment as possible for all.

We will keep you informed of any changes to the conference as soon as possible.

Call for Papers: ‘Adaptation in the Humanities: Reimagining the Past, Present and Future’

Our knowledge of the world — imagined, experienced, or learned — is constantly in flux. As humans, we change, adapt, and mould the environments around us, the knowledge systems we use and the items we create. Adaptation can be forced through the presentation of an obstacle, or it can occur symbiotically within a group.

In 2020 Limina: The Journal of Historical and Cultural Studies, the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group (PMRG), and Medieval and Early Modern Studies at The University of Western Australia are joining forces to provide a forum for the presentation of the myriad of ‘adaptations’ worlds, individuals, languages, ideas, and peoples, real or otherwise, experience.

The conference will be held at The University of Western Australia from the 3–4 October 2020. It will consist of a masterclass, opening plenary address and reception on 2 October. The main conference will take place on 3–4 October 2020. For full details, please visit the conference website: https://conference.pmrg.org.au.

The conference committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers or panels (of no more than three speakers) from the breadth of humanities research to explore the products of adaptations, and the processes that bring them into being.

Papers topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Literary and popular culture adaptations (e.g. text to screen; children’s literature and YA adaptations of texts, graphic novel and video-game recreations of literary classics);
  • Adaptations throughout history (e.g. Cultural adaptations, reception, neoclassicism, medievalism, early modernism, Neo-Victorianism, Gothic revival, science fiction, utopianism, etc.);
  • Adaptation of memory (e.g. emotion or event based i.e. historical re-enactments, responses to crises/trauma/adversity/oppressive systems);
  • Translation studies (e.g. translations of medieval manuscripts or ancient papyri);
  • Adaptation and electronic literature (e.g. going beyond re-mediation to interface and recreate the text)
  • Childhood studies (e.g. learning; education; “adapting to and through the world”);
  • Critical studies on visual adaptations (e.g. interpretive dance; interactive artworks);
  • Adaptations of the self (e.g. biographies; auto-biographies, con-artists, fakes, forgeries and scams);
  • Adaptation and embodiment (e.g disability, immaterial bodies, in/corporality, disability; cyborgs, AI);
  • Adaptations of reality (e.g. sci-fi; hallucinogens, VR);
  • Museum and Material Studies (e.g. displaying/reinterpreting/rehousing material artefacts to contemporary audiences, heritage studies and technology, 3D modeling/printing);
  • Environmental adaptations (e.g. permanently or temporarily adapting the environment to suit the needs of humans, artificial environments, biospheres/biodomes);
  • Adaptation of space and place (e.g. rehabilitation, renovation, renewal, gentrification, repatriation).

Conference abstract submissions should consist of:

  • A title
  • An abstract (max. 200 words);
  • A short biography (max. 50 words).

Submit abstracts to: [email protected] by the 31 May 2020. The committee aims to have responses returned by 14 June 2020.

Limina and PMRG also welcome themed panel or workshop session proposals for the conference. Proposals should consist of:

  • Panel Title;
  • Proposed Chair (if available);
  • Details of each presenter and paper as described above.

Submit panel/workshop proposals to:  [email protected] by 31 May 2020.

There will be a limited number of bursaries available for post-graduate students and early career researchers (within 5 years of the award of their degree) for presenters travelling from interstate or overseas. Details of the bursaries will be announced shortly.

‘Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World’ – Registration now open!

Registration is now open for the ‘Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World’, the annual PMRG/CMEMS conference, to be held at The University of Western Australia on 19 October 2019.

Please note: A conference dinner at local Thai restaurant Itsara will follow the conference.

Registration closes Friday 11 August 2019 (5pm AWST).

To register please visit the conference website: https://conference.pmrg.org.au

 

Travel Bursaries: ‘Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World’ conference

The Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group (PMRG) will fund TWO travel bursaries up to $500 each for it’s upcoming conference ‘Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World‘.

These bursaries are available on a competitive basis for two ECRs (no more than 5 years from the award of their PhD) who do not have substantive academic employment and whose conference paper is accepted. The bursary will be awarded on the basis of merit and the paper’s relevance to the symposium topic.

Should you wish to apply for the travel bursary, please send a short CV (no more than 1 page), along with your paper title, abstract, and biography by 31 May 2019 to [email protected].

Call For Papers: ‘Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World’

Modern stereotypes abound regarding how mental health was perceived during the medieval and early modern period ranging from mental illness being caused by sin to the idea that the attainment of mental wellbeing could only be achieved through the balancing of the bodily humours. But mental health was a more complex and expansive subject of discourse throughout the period that was widely explored in medical treatises, religious tracts and sermons, and prominent in art and literature, which speaks to a more subtle understanding of the human mental state.

This conference aims to look at both the changing and continuing perceptions of mental health throughout the medieval and early modern period.

We welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, art, and literature, but not limited to, the following broad headings:

  • Suicide
  • Marginal lives
  • Melancholy / Depression
  • Insanity / Mental disorder
  • Rapture / Ecstasy
  • Bodily humours
  • Addiction
  • Anguish
  • Therapies
  • Meditation / Mindfulness / Well-being
  • Imagination
  • Dreams / Visions / Memory
  • Criminality
  • Self-harm
  • Solitude
  • Natural / Kind / Unnatural

Keynote speaker: Professor Yasmin Haskell (The University of Western Australia)

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to: [email protected]ail.com by 31 May 2019.

Enquiries: [email protected]

Conference website: https://conference.pmrg.org.au

PMRG/CMEMS Annual Conference, 2013

TEXTUALITY TECHNOLOGY MATERIALITY
In the Medieval and Early Modern World28-30 November 2013
The University of Western Australia, Perth

Confirmed plenary speakers:
* Professor Tim Fitzpatrick (The University of Sydney)

Call for abstracts
The convenors of the 19th Annual Conference of the Perth Medieval and
Renaissance Group, co-sponsored by the UWA Centre for Medieval and
Early Modern Studies, welcome abstracts (c.200 words) for 20-minute
papers exploring medieval and early modern cultures of technology,
textuality, and materiality, c.600 to 1800 CE. We welcome proposals
for papers (or panels of 3 papers) which consider:

* The social and cultural lives and afterlives of medieval and early
modern material objects
* Manuscripts, inscriptions, illustrations, letters, the printing
press and other medieval and early modern communication technologies
* The production, transmission, and mediation of medieval and early modern texts
* The application and/or impact of modern technologies to medieval and
early modern materials

Abstracts and panel proposals (along with titles and brief bios for
speakers) should be emailed to [email protected] addressed to the
convenors — Professor Andrew Lynch, Associate Professor Anne M. Scott, and Dr Brett D. Hirsch — by no later than 1 September 2013.

Further details
Further details about the conference programme, registration, and
postgraduate travel assistance will be made available on
http://conference.pmrg.org.au/